Climate Change

The number one threat to birds

Sharp-tailed Grouse. Photo: J. Arthur Anderson / Audubon Photography Awards

Climate change has become one of our greatest conservation challenges. The National Audubon Society’s Birds and Climate Report found that 189 of Washington's most iconic and beloved bird species are threatened by a changing climate. Many of these species are currently threatened by other factors, such as habitat loss, while others are species we previously considered secure but could face significant shifts in their ranges as a result of climate change.

Now, more than ever, we have a responsibility to be the voice of the birds and aggressively combat this urgent threat head on by rapidly reducing climate polluting emissions. Over the next five years Audubon Washington is focused on:

  • Increasing habitat protection in focused areas of Eastern Washington that are expected to provide essential habitat for birds under a future warmer climate.

  • Ensuring resilient coastal estuaries will continue to support marine and shorebird populations along Pacific Flyway migration routes.

  • Advocating for 100% clean energy in the state of Washington, including a broad suite of policies - from energy standards to pricing mechanisms - that will reduce emissions fairly and equitably.

  • Building a stronger, more diverse force for advocacy on climate change, to monitor birds and advance solutions that are commensurate with this threat.    

What the climate-threatened status of the Violet Green Swallow means to one Audubon member

Birds and Climate Change
Climate

Birds and Climate Change

Audubon science tells us a warming planet is the number one threat to birds.

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Washington's Climate-Threatened Birds
Climate

Washington's Climate-Threatened Birds

189 climate-sensitive bird species occur in Washington.

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Clean Energy
Climate

Clean Energy

Reducing our carbon footprint in the Pacific Northwest.

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Oil Transport
Climate

Oil Transport

An increasing threat through our communities and along our waterways.

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Climate Sensitive Birds in Washington

How you can help, right now